Angie lives in a beautiful, yet remote part of Honduras, so when her family discovered she had epilepsy, it was devastating news. Not only did they not have the access to get the medical attention she needed, but they had also had very few resources to pay for it.

The Parents are Jeremias & Santos Alfaro (al-far-o). From the left they are Jeremias, Angie, Alba, Santos, and Alex.

In 2011, PM2 family member, Liz Riggs, brought Angie and her family to our attention. Angie’s father, Jeremias works as a “Watchee”/Helper/Protector to Liz while living in Honduras. Liz literally trusts Jeremias with her life. 

Jeremias, his wife, and 3 children (now 4!) were living with his mom in a house with dirt floor, no refrigerator, and cooking outside on a wood fire. Even living in these conditions the children were clean and neat, happy.  Angie was 7, and would be in 2nd grade if she were allowed to go, Alba in 4th grade, and Alex starting 1st grade.  That was when Jeremias brought his daughters medical records to Liz, explaining her medical condition (She has epilepsy and pretty severe seizures) and the obstacles that she and the family would encounter if she were to get treatment.  In addition to the medical costs (the testing and medicines are the biggest burden), they would have to travel far away, so Jeremias would have to come up with the travel costs, incur the missed income from several days of work, and plus the cost of an overnight stay each time she had to see the doctor.  This was all more than this family could even imagine paying for.  This was the situation that Liz presented to PM2.  We have added our financial help to Liz’s endless energy to make sure that Angie gets the medical attention and medicines that she needs.    

Liz has spent considerable time and money to aid this family. She has built a house on her property for them to live in and, since bringing Angie’s needs the attention of PM2, has managed all of the finances and logistics of obtaining the medical care Angie has needed. 

Angie is now 12 years old. still has seizures and as she grows, her medicines will continue to be adjusted, but due to the care she is receiving, they aren’t as bad or as often as before.